International Studies Electives

International Studies Electives




The Bachelor of Science Degree Program in International Transportation and Trade (ITT) requires that students complete two international studies electives.  The list of courses that can be used by students to meet the I.S. requirement needs to be updated to include all of the following courses; it is not exclusive because from time to time new courses are added, but any course currently in the college catalog NOT on the list cannot be used for I.S. electives.  In addition, all foreign language courses will be accepted as I.S. electives.  Transfer credits, including specific courses within study abroad programs, will be evaluated as may be appropriate by the Department Chair. 

 

ENGL 413 Novels of Latin America

3 class hours, 3 credits.

Latin America has produced several recent Nobel Prize winners in literature. The writing of the region reflects both the extreme political conflicts of today and the lingering effects of the region’s historical and cultural past. Reading and discussion focus on both the historical and the magic realist schools of prose fiction.

Prerequisite: HUMN 201 or 202

 

ENGL 415 Literature of Colonialism

3 class hours, 3 credits.

How does colonialism affect those who have been colonized, and those who are doing the colonizing? This course studies colonialism, as it is expressed in two sets of literary

works: those written from the viewpoint of colonizers, and those written from the

viewpoint of corresponding colonized peoples. Areas focused on include Africa, India,

and Southeast Asia.

Prerequisite: HUMN 201 or 202.

 

ENGL 416 Literature of the Sea

3 class hours, 3 credits.

Reading and discussion of works by important European and American authors dealing

with maritime themes.

Prerequisite: HUMN 201 or 202.

 

ENGL 418 Contemporary Literature

3 class hours, 3 credits.

A study of literature written during the past eighty years, leading to the many styles of

today. The movement from modernism to post-modernism will be traced through novels and short stories from around the world. Emphasis is placed on introducing new voices, from a diversity of cultures.

Prerequisite: HUMN 201 or 202.

 

ENGL 470 Major British Authors

3 class hours, 3 credits.

Intensive reading of selected works by representative British authors.

Prerequisite: HUMN 201 or 202.

 

GBLW 437 International Law

3 class hours, 3 credits.

Topics covered include the sources of international law, sovereignty, the jurisdiction of

the nation state and the community of nations, and the status of diplomatic representatives. The law of the sea is examined extensively, including territorial seas,

contiguous zones, exclusive economic zones, innocent passage, hot pursuit, freedom of

navigation, fishing rights, scientific research and mineral exploitation.

 

GBMG 347 Entrepreneurship in International Transportation and Trade

3 class hours, 3 credits.

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of entrepreneurship in

international transportation and trade, including the critical features of starting and

maintaining a new business venture or marketing a new product. The course takes the

student entrepreneur from the product concept to making it a reality. Topics to be covered include: entrepreneurial ideas, innovation, and behavior, the role of entrepreneurs in business, financing and financial planning, legal aspects of new venture formation, organization of the venture, managerial functions pertaining to strategies, planning and human resource management, marketing the firm’s products to potential customers and the ethical and social responsibilities of entrepreneurs. Class discussions and team activities will focus on the development of a suitable new entrepreneurial business and marketing plan.

Prerequisite: GBMG 345.

 

GBMG 442 International Marketing Management

3 class hours, 3 credits.

An in-depth analysis of the issues involved in developing international marketing

programs from the determination of objectives and evaluation of opportunities to the

implementation of global strategies. Cases and exercises emphasize how marketing

principles are applied and different marketing mixes are developed by multinational

providers of goods and services.

Prerequisite: GBMG 345.

 

GBMG 443 Cross-Cultural Management

3 class hours, 3 credits.

This course considers the challenges of doing business across different national cultures. Topics include identifying cultural differences and their impacts on relationships with customers, suppliers, subordinates, superiors and co-workers. The effect of language, religion, value systems and social structure are considered, as are the implications of differences in attitudes toward performance, uncertainty, assertiveness, individualism, gender, leadership and expectations about the future.

Prerequisite: GBMG 341.

 

GBTT 460 Principles of Global Supply Chain Security

3 class hours, 3 credits.

The course depicts security as a control mechanism in several major channels in the

supply chain; e.g. in human resources confidentiality of employee records; in logistics

cargo and passenger security; in communications encrypted email and hacker-free

databases; in finance sanctity of credit cards and identity; and in marketing protection of intellectual property. Students will engage in a team research project as a practicum for learning how to develop and conduct vulnerability assessments and security planning. A major underlying course theme is that security can only be successfully developed and implemented in context of the cultural, economic, and political contexts of the supply chain processes for which it serves as a control mechanism.

Prerequisite: Junior (2nd class) standing or permission from the department.

 

HIST 401-402 Topics in European Civilization I-II

3 class hours, 3 credits each semester.

Survey of European civilization from the Middle Ages to the end of World War II.

Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

 

HIST 418 History of American Foreign Policy

3 class hours, 3 credits.

A survey of the major developments in American foreign policy.

Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

 

HIST 419 China in the 20th Century

3 class hours, 3 credits.

A survey of the major political developments in modern China.

Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

 

HIST 421 Vietnam and America

3 class hours, 3 credits.

Vietnam in the Twentieth Century. Focus on America's direct involvement and a

consideration of its legacy for the U.S. and for Southeast Asia.

Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

 

HIST 423 War, Revolution, and Stalinism

3 class hours, 3 credits.

The development of Marxism and Leninism; the connections between war and revolution in 1905 and 1917; the factors which made possible Bolshevik seizure and consolidation of power; and Stalin's rise and the consequences of his rule.

Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

 

HIST 425 History of Technology

3 class hours, 3 credits.

A survey of selected major developments in Western technology, and their effects on

society. Analysis of the process of technological innovation, and the application of

modern technology in resource-limited societies. Special emphasis on those

developments which bear on modern life and work.

Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

 

MT 408 International Safety Management

3 class hours, 3 credits.

This course will introduce students to the ship management requirements found in the

IMO’s International Safety Management Code and how those requirements and

principles are applied in the international shipping industry. Students will become

familiar with the various aspects of the code and how the Code is implemented through

such programs as safety management programs. Extensive use of case studies will be

made.

 

MT 435 Maritime Security

3 class hours, 3 credits.

Perform Federal Level 1 Anti-Terrorism Training. Instruct in Chemical, Biological and

Radiological Defense (CBR-D). Obtain certification as a Company and Vessel Security Officer. Instruction and discussion on current Security issues and technology. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge in

Maritime Security and prepare them to be a Company or Vessel Security Officer.

Note, this course material is about implementation of an international agreement, the International Ship & Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code, and includes comparative examination of how other countries structure and enforce implementation.